Overall
Why Prepare?
Citizen
Local
State
Federal

Basic Preparedness
Getting Informed
Planning and Checklists
Special Needs
Disaster Supplies Kit
Shelter
Others

Natural Hazards
Floods
Hurricanes
Thunderstorms and lightning
Tornadoes
Winter storms and extreme cold
Extreme heat
Earthquakes
Volcanoes
Landslides and debris flow
Tsunamis
Fires
Wildfires

Technological Hazards
Hazardous materials incidents
Household chemical emergencies
Nuclear power plant emergencies

Terrorism
Explosions
Biological threats
Chemical threats
Nuclear blasts
Radiological dispersion device events

Recovering from Disaster
Health and safety guidelines
Returning home
Seeking disaster assistance
Coping with disaster
Helping others
 

Health and Safety Issues

How can I Aid the Injured?

Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of death or further injury. If you must move an unconscious person, first stabilize the neck and back, then call for help immediately.

If the victim is not breathing, carefully position the victim for artificial respiration, clear the airway and commence mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

Maintain body temperature with blankets

Never try to feed liquids to an unconscious person

Health
Donít try to do too much at once

Set priorities and pace yourself

Get enough rest

Drink plenty of clean water

Eat well

Wear sturdy work boots and gloves

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and clean water often when working in debris

Safety Issues
Be aware of new safety issues created by the disaster

Watch for washed out roads, contaminated buildings, contaminated water, gas leaks, broken glass, damaged electrical wiring and slippery floors

Inform local authorities about health and safety issues, including chemical spills, downed power lines, washed out roads, smoldering insulation and dead animals